the photo/video showdown

Imagine this scenario: You’re a wedding photographer. You show up to a wedding, and you realize the couple hired a videographer (or two or three). What’s your first thought? Are you nervous? Annoyed? Feeling competitive? Oftentimes videographers have a stigma of being in the way, unapproachable, and even a little awkward. It’s ok, it’s usually true. I’ve been on the other side of this as a videographer. And let me tell you, sometimes photographers come across as being slightly full of themselves and intimidating. (But really, most photogs are great!)

But does it have to be a competition, an “us vs. them” scenario? Can’t we all just get along? Well, yes. Here are some tips for working alongside a videographer/photographer to make sure you’re each getting the best film & photos that you’ve set out to get.

  1. You’re on the same team.

The couple is paying a lot of money for you both because they value your work. They want the photographer there, and they want the videographer there. Respect that and work together. There’s a greater goal in capturing beautiful images, so check your ego at the door. You’ll each get better results if you work from a team mentality. But don’t let it end there–have conversations throughout the day and get to know each other. Since you’ll be around each other all day, feeling comfortable will enable you to perform at the top of your game.

  1. Don’t be shy.

When we are filming a wedding, we always contact the photographer ahead of time to introduce ourselves and to notify them that we’ll be working together. This makes things go much more smoothly on the wedding day because an understanding has already been created. So much tension and conflict can be avoided by a simple email or phone call a week in advance.

  1. Learn the dance.

Wedding days go by fast and oftentimes you’re stuck in a small room with too many people. Learn to work quickly and with each other in any wedding day scenario. Be courteous; let the videographer get the shots they need, and they’ll let you get yours. In fact, once you get used to working together, you’ll gain a sense for when the other person will need something which can help you think ahead and be prepared for what’s next. In a word, communicate. It’s as simple as that. You’ll be “dancing” in no time.

  1. Have fun!

Getting to know each other and working together can be a blast and is one of my favorite parts of filming weddings. There are a number of photographers who we’ve collaborated with multiple times who we really look forward to working with because it’s just more fun together. You might as well take the time and effort to get to know each other. You’ve got nothing to lose so make the most of the day! Who knows, you might gain some new friends.

  1. Help each other.

Cross-promote each other’s work. If you’re a photographer, consider posting the videographer’s video at the bottom of your blog post. If you’re a videographer, consider giving a shout out to the photographer by linking to their blog post on your Facebook or blog. Refer each other to clients. Consult each other. The list goes on. Helping each other can’t hurt, and in fact probably will only help.

  1. Collaboration is key.

Being on the same team will make a better world for everyone, and a better experience for the couples who believe in the work we are all doing. There’s a big difference between a spirit of collaboration and a spirit of competition. With a little patience and openness, good things will happen and great relationships can begin.

How about you?

What have your experiences been like working with videographers (or vice versa)? Do you have any tips to add? Feel free to comment with your suggestions!

Also, did you know that we offer videography AND photography at weddings? We offer discounts if you book us for both. Inquire (connect@bradleyproductions.com) for more information.

10407999_927360837278362_6778292687878310293_n

James Kessel

Cinematographer/Editor by celebration. Michigan native. Eager student. Disciplined creative. Jack of all trades.

Submit a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *